Dancing Series

 
 

Blue Lindy

 
 
 

Red Duo II

 
 
 

Blue Samba

 
 
 

Red Duo IV

 
 
 

Eye Candy

 
 
 

Red Duo I

 
 
 

Red Duo III

 
 
"Dancing Series" with sculpture by Jodie Roth Cooper in "kinesis: PRISCILLA FOWLER & JODIE ROTH COOPER," installed in 2015 at Mai Wyn Fine Art, Denver, CO.

"Dancing Series" with sculpture by Jodie Roth Cooper in "kinesis: PRISCILLA FOWLER & JODIE ROTH COOPER," installed in 2015 at Mai Wyn Fine Art, Denver, CO.

 

About This Series

My current art practice began with a conflation of the concepts of “happy accident” and the “artist's hand.” I grew up in an era when machine-like perfection was the goal of human hand-work. I remember sophisticated stuffed dolls sewn by my aunt and cousin, beautiful tatting by my great aunt, perfectly-even stitches in the knitting of a friend, the extremely refined and precise woodworking of my grandfather. I grew to appreciate the skill and discipline required by such work, and the resulting beauty. I was envious of those who could achieve this level of perfection. So when, in art school, I learned that with practice I myself could achieve such near-perfection, I was at first quite proud of myself.

But over time those results became less interesting to me than what resulted when “accidents” happened. “Accidents” created interesting formal (color and compositional) problems to solve. Also, the distinctiveness of my “hand” as compared with that of other artists (for example, in life drawing classes) became something to take note of. This combination of accidents and “hand” became fundamental to my understanding of art and artists, and helped me see deeply what distinguishes one person's work from another's, what constitutes a particular artist's authenticity. I came to see this: the compelling gorgeousness of a watercolor, even from a master of that medium like Winslow Homer; or the nuances of an oil wash on untreated canvas, such as from Elaine de Kooning; these came NOT just from “perfect” technique (i.e., skill with materials) but also from the subtleties of the working process of that particular artist.

The seven works in the “Dancing” series, shown here, reflect an exploration of accident within loosely controlled symmetry.  The opposition of similar large forms reminded me of ballroom dancing. The smaller forms swirling within and around the larger ones reminded me of the color, light, and movement of dancers on a ballroom floor.