(May-June) Exhibition - Rosanne Giacomini - Contemporary Fiber Paintings
May
4
Jul 1

(May-June) Exhibition - Rosanne Giacomini - Contemporary Fiber Paintings

"Turquoise Burst" from Contemporary Fiber Paintings

Rosanne’s interest in nature has always been a compelling inspiration.  She likes to use found objects as themes for her work.  She works with many types of fabrics, threads and fibers.  New and recycled fabrics of sumptuous silks, brilliant batiks, earthy wovens and wool, leather, colorful threads of rayon, cotton and metal, beads, wire, paints, markers and dyes - all combine to bring her imagination to life.  It would not be a surprise for her to include pieces of fabric from - even her husband’s shirt!  She uses a variety of techniques which vary for each of her one of a kind pieces.  For machine sewing, she prefers using a sewing machine from her collection of vintage New Home and Necchi machines rather than a more modern computerized machine.  She includes hand sewing in her pieces, as well.  To add definition or to enhance color and shading, she may use paints, makers or dyes.  Although she may begin a piece by sketching, the real “magic” happens when her cutting, sewing and embellishing are guided purely by instinct.  Her pieces are assembled piece by piece; almost like putting together a puzzle. Rosanne has lived in Las Vegas since 2005.  She enjoyed time spent in New Mexico, where she became involved with the art community there.  She was born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  As a little girl, she watched her Nana (Italian grandmother), who sewed in a factory for a living; sew on her Singer treadle sewing machine.  The machine intrigued her and was Rosanne’s initial inspiration to sew.  Rosanne’s mother showed her how to sew “Barbie” clothes.  As an adolescent, she designed and sewed her own clothing.  She’s been sewing ever since.  While attending Brookfield East High School, in Wisconsin, she spent as much time as possible in art classes.  She studied ceramics; particularly raku, fiber art, wood working and jewelry.   Marc Sijon, her ceramics teacher, who is currently the number one ranked ”Hyper Realistic Sculpture” artist in the world, was especially instrumental in Rosanne’s motivation to become an artist. 

 

When I’m deep into my work, when time escapes me, when the flow happens, that’s when I know I’m doing what I was meant to do.
— Rosanne Giacomini
(July-Aug) Exhibition - Lolita Develay - Indulge
Jul
6
Sep 2

(July-Aug) Exhibition - Lolita Develay - Indulge

"Let Them Eat Cake" from Indulge

Let Them Eat Cake

Let Them Eat Cake

Her work has been described as photorealist depictions, in watercolor and oils, of contemporary subject matter characteristic of Las Vegas. 

My work is about life as I am able to observe it.

— Lolita Develay
 
(Sept-Oct) Exhibition - Richard Jacobi - Mythologies
Aug
31
Oct 28

(Sept-Oct) Exhibition - Richard Jacobi - Mythologies

"Fat Dog" from Mythologies

Contemplating Cosmic Road HazardsGraphite/Illustration board

Myth: The biker, Fat Dog, sits on a Harley carburetor in the midst of his intense worldview. He gets a handle on his environment with a little help from reason implicit in a right triangle.

The square of the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the opposite sides. Pythagoras

The Iguana attempts to hold Fat Dog to the earth but the biker has passed on and now exists in a mythological world. His halo is the spring-loaded kick-starter on a Harley engine, the moon a carburetor cover. A master chain link is the skeleton’s lumbar vertebrae, an eternal fusion with the bike. The stag beetle bites an old injury on the biker’s leg. Its own legs are a tool kit. The chicken wearing a tennis shoe is a nightmare, a terrible image the biker must hold at bay. The cane toad is the biker’s fat, little friend and is a symbol of self-presence in the drawing.

Sturgis, of course, is a universal goal.

 Print #1a, image size: 22”x 30”, paper size: 24”x 32”

 Print #1b, image size: 15”x 20.5”, paper size: 17”x 22.5”

 

(Mar-Apr) Exhibition - William H Thielen - A Journey in All Directions: Paintings and Drawings
Mar
2
Apr 29

(Mar-Apr) Exhibition - William H Thielen - A Journey in All Directions: Paintings and Drawings

Selected Pieces from A Journey in All Directions: Paintings and Drawings

1 (1).jpg

THIS IS A VISUAL FIELD!
Emotions are the aesthetic glue of the work.
All good art is based on a truth;
it is about working towards an unknown.
The Intellects Are Wrong.
Stop Thinking and Start Feeling!
Trust the intuitive voice.
Sounds easy, but it’s not. Why do you think so few artists work in this manner?

When creating pictorial or sculptural objects, it is risky to trust the intuitive nature of emotions and the intellectual information that comes from observation.

For me, the only way to overcome this risk is in the language of abstraction.

The process of abstraction is one of spontaneity, flexibility, and trusting the intuitive nature of the act. Also inherent is an emotional reaction and metaphorical reckoning on the part of the viewer. All of this helps to create a new visual language in which to address the issues behind the visual statement.

The issues behind my work are personal and autobiographical. I work with these issues because they are my attempt to find my own true identity in a divisive social structure. Maybe in a way I am trying to find a momentary calm while existing in a society that is full of hostility and hatred.

These works are about extremes, how they need each other to define each other, and the tension that is created when opposites are thrust together. The compositions—sometimes simple, other times complex—aid in the process of building these works. As the work progresses it evolves. Sometimes black and white is dominant and other times, color, much as life is not always—if ever—on an even plain.

The black and white tends to be the backbone of each piece. It is about the constant struggle of good and bad, life and death, control, rigidity, and—sometimes—sick humor.

The color is entirely about emotions. They are something we all have, yet many people avoid them. If one does not trust them, they can have a profoundly negative effect. To embrace them leads to a positive integration into one’s self, and a healthy way of expressing them. No matter what one does, they will always be there.

I concentrate on the history of the process so that it silently complicates the depth of the object. By juxtaposing complicated geometric patterns with freehand shapes and line, works are created that stimulate, disturb, and distill feeling. The viewer, through a metaphorical language, must attempt to resolve this tension and find the truth in these works.

These pieces are about looking for emotional truth in a post-modern world. I constantly ask myself, “Where do I fit in? Am I legitimate?” I ask the same of these pieces. Where do they fit in? Are they painting, sculpture or mixed media? I leave it to each viewer to answer the question.

— William H. Thielen


Artist Statment

These works are about extremes, how they need each other to define each other, and the tension that is created when opposites are thrust together.  The compositionsósometimes simple, other times complexóaid in the process of building these works.  As the work progresses it evolves.  Sometimes black and white is dominant and other times, color, much as life is not alwaysóif everóon an even plain. 

The black and white tends to be the backbone of each piece.  It is about the constant struggle of good and bad, life and death, control, rigidity, andósometimesósick humor.  

The color is entirely about emotions.  They are something we all have, yet many people avoid them.  If one does not trust them, they can have a profoundly negative effect.  To embrace them leads to a positive integration into oneís self, and a healthy way of expressing them.  No matter what one does, they will always be there.

Artist Biography

A native of Pierre, South Dakota, with both a B.S. and M.F.A. in Art, Thielen has also studied with Judy Pfaff, Ross Bleckner and Charles Cohen.  He has been a full-time studio artist, living and working in Carbondale, Illinois, since 1980.  His abstract work runs the gamut: painting, drawing, sculpture, print and installations.